Eyes on the SRC – June 16, 2016

SRC pic 5-19-16

by Deborah Grill
June 14, 2016

Each month, APPS publishes our “Eyes on the SRC” in which we select some of the resolutions to be voted on at the next meeting for perusal and analysis. As of this writing, the SRC has posted 129 resolutions for the June 16 Action Meeting. Eight of those resolutions involve charter school renewals or amendments to other charters. Two resolutions involve approvals of the charter licenses for John Wister Mastery Charter School and Global Leadership Academy at Huey Charter School as part of the Renaissance program. One resolution re-establishes Kenderton Elementary as a District operated neighborhood school.

There are too many resolutions in The Academic Payments/Contracts for APPS to investigate before Thursday’s meeting.   Many of these resolutions involve the outsourcing of services and involve millions of dollars.   We encourage you to look them over. You can access them on the School District’s website.

At its May 28 meeting, the SRC again tabled the resolutions on the non-renewals of Aspira Olney High School and Aspira Stetson Middle School.

This month, without explanation, the SRC has failed to post the resolutions on non-renewal of the two Aspira schools. In addition, non-renewal resolutions for two Universal schools, Audenried and Vare, have disappeared since being postponed two meetings ago. Will the SRC tell the public what is happening and whether or not the process is continuing? Or is this process taking place behind closed doors?

Please note: there is a second Action meeting this month: Thursday, June 30 @ 4:30 PM.

To register to speak at either one, call 215-400-4180 before 4:30 PM the day before the meeting.


Selected Resolutions and APPS Analysis

Resolution SRC-4
Adoption of School Advisory Council Policy
As of 6/7/2016

RESOLVED, that the School Reform Commission approves and adopts a Board Policy on School Advisory Councils, in the form attached to this resolution.

Description: On March 2, 2016, the SRC held a Strategy, Policy, and Priorities Meeting on family and community school advisory groups. There were more than 200 participants and 67 schools represented at the meeting. Subsequently, the SRC received more than 65 nomination forms from those interested in participating on the SRC working group to develop a policy recommendation. The working group consisted of 24 members. Members included Commissioners, an Assistant Superintendent, principals, student, teachers, District staff, school based staff, parents, and community members. The group represented each of the Neighborhood Networks along with the Autonomy and Turnaround Networks. The working group met three times to develop a policy recommendation and collect input from the general public. All materials from these meetings have been posted on the SRC website. The School District’s Office of Family and Community Engagement will begin developing an implementation plan subsequent to the SRC’s vote on the policy recommendation.

APPS analysis: School Advisory Policy was the topic of one of the only two Strategy, Policies and Priorities meetings held by the District this year. The District is making a push to establish a School Advisory Council (SAC) in every school. We believe that parents should have a say in the governance of their children’s schools, but not to the exclusion of the other members of the school community, including faculty and staff, who have been excluded in recent turnarounds of public schools. We are encouraged that these stakeholders are included in the members of the working group. We hope the policy reflects that.


Resolutions for Renewals or Amendments to Charter

SRC-9 (Pending)
Application for Charter Renewal – Mastery Charter School Clymer Elementary

SRC-10 (Pending)
Application for Charter Renewal – Mastery Charter School Simon Gratz Campus

SRC-11 (Pending)
Application for Charter Renewal – Mastery Charter School Shoemaker Campus

SRC-12 (Pending)
Ratification of Charter Amendment – Pan American Academy Charter School

SRC-13 (Pending)
Request for Charter Amendment – Laboratory Charter School of Communication and Languages

SRC-14 (Pending)
Request for Charter Amendment – Russell Byers Charter School

SRC-15 (Pending)
Charter Agreement – KIPP West Philadelphia Charter School

SRC-16 (Pending)
Request for Charter Amendment (Name Change) – Multi-Cultural Academy Charter School

SRC-17 (Pending)
Request for Charter Amendment – TECH Freire Charter School

APPS Analysis: According to the District’s School Progress Report ( SPR ) Mastery Clymer and Mastery Gratz are in the lowest performance level (Intervene 0-24%) in 3 out of 3 categories (Overall, Achievement and Progress). Mastery Shoemaker is in the lowest category in 2 out of 3 categories (Achievement and Progress). KIPP West Philadelphia is at the lowest performance level in Achievement. According to the District’s website, the purpose of the Renaissance charter program is to “dramatically improve the learning environment in underperforming school district schools and to create highly effective schools that provide exceptional opportunities for student achievement and preparedness for success in college and the workforce.”   The SPR scores of these 4 charters indicate no dramatic improvement. Why is the SRC voting to renew them when they have failed in their mission?


Resolution  A-2
Categorical/Grant Fund: $661,032 Contract with the New Teacher Project – New Principal Coaching

RESOLVED, that the School Reform Commission authorizes The School District of Philadelphia, through the Superintendent or his designee, to execute, deliver and perform a contract with The New Teacher Project, to provide coaching to first- and second-year principals, as part of the New Principals Academy, for an amount not to exceed $661,032, for the period commencing June 17, 2016 through June 30, 2017.

Description: The School District of Philadelphia is seeking job-embedded coaching and professional development (PD) facilitation support for first- and second-year principals participating in the New Principals’ Academy. The coaching and professional development facilitation support will improve principals’ effectiveness as instructional leaders and building managers as measured by improvements in student learning, as well as improvement in principals’ performance on the Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) Framework for Leadership in the following domains: 1b (uses data for informed decision making), 2b (ensures a high-quality, high-performing staff), 3c (implements high-quality instruction), and 4a (maximizes professional responsibilities through parent involvement and community outreach).

APPS Analysis: The New Teacher Project was founded by corporate education reform spokesperson Michelle Rhee.   Its website now claims that it was “founded by teachers”. However, only 6 of its 18-member leadership team are former teachers, and 5 of those six were TFA teachers— in other words, only one has substantial classroom experience.   TNTPs research, funded by the Gates Foundation and the Walton Foundation, among others, and on which TNTP bases their teacher and principal training, is questionable at best.   Why is the District paying an organization to coach principals that supports the policies that have driven most of the experienced principals out of the school district?   How does the District justify such an expense at this time?


 Resolution A-3
Categorical/Grant Fund: $90,000 Contract with Teach for America, Inc. – Highly Qualified Teachers in Critical Needs Subjects Alternative Route to Certification Program

RESOLVED, that the School Reform Commission authorizes The School District of Philadelphia, through the Superintendent or his designee, to execute, deliver, and perform a contract with Teach For America, Inc. to hire up to 20 new and support 10 second year teachers at the School District’s sole discretion for the 2016-2017 school year, at a rate of $3,000 per teacher per year, for a total amount not to exceed $90,000, for the period commencing July 1, 2016 through June 30, 2017, with three one-year options to renew through June 30, 2020.

Description: In keeping with the District’s goal to recruit highly qualified teachers in hard to staff subjects by utilizing Alternative Route to Certification programs which attract mid-career professionals/career changers, the District proposes to continue to partner with Teach For America, Inc. (TFA) to provide up to 20 new and 10 second year Highly Qualified teachers for the start of School Year 2016-2017. All fees are paid to TFA after the start of the school year in September.

The program design will enhance the delivery of Highly Qualified teachers in high need subject areas, as well as strive to provide for higher diversity rates and increased retention which are both strategically targeted goals.

TFA’s recruitment efforts will focus especially on recent college graduates and mid-career professionals targeting committed individuals with strong content knowledge who are seeking to make a long-term career change. TFA will provide teachers in high need subjects such as those who are dual certified in Math, Science, English, and Special Education.

After a rigorous selection process, the TFA teachers undergo extensive pre-service training in the TFA Institute which will provide direct, supervised in-classroom experience to TFA corps members. TFA provides ongoing supports to its teachers. The TFA corps teachers serve for a minimum of two years, with the long term goal of becoming educational leaders within the District.

APPS Analysis: Teach for America is not in the business of providing highly-qualified teachers—it is in the business of replacing them. The District is paying $3,000 per teacher per year in addition to the TFA teachers’ salaries. TFA corps members are put into the classroom after only 5 weeks of training. While the description states that TFA corp members teach for a minimum of 2 years, the reality is that the 2 years is often the maximum that they serve. Why is the District paying more for less prepared teachers? The description also states that the long-term goal of TFA corps members is to become educational leaders within the District—like Michelle Rhee?


 Resolution A-32

Operating Budget: $325,000 Contract Amendment with U.S. Computing, Inc. (aka SEON) – Transportation Management Services

RESOLVED, that the School Reform Commission authorizes The School District of Philadelphia, through the Superintendent or his designee, to execute, deliver and perform an amendment of Contract No. 427/F13, originally entered into with the SEON pursuant to Resolution No. A-12, approved by the School Reform Commission on December 20, 2012, by increasing the amount of the contract by an additional $325,000, from the $1,140,951.35 approved by Resolution A-12, to an amount not to exceed $1,465,951.35.

Description: The School District of Philadelphia (SDP) Transportation Services serves more than 100,000 students attending more than 600 public, charter and non-public schools throughout the region. In 2011, SDP contracted with SEON to acquire routing software, which was used for the first time prior to the 2015-16 academic year. SEON was chosen through a competitive RFP process (RFP-315) that began in November 2011. RFP-315 required that prospective vendors provide an application that would automate the complete process of scheduling, reporting, tracking/monitoring, and other support of its student transportation services. SDP received responses from six vendors and the RFP Review Committee – comprised of staff from Transportation, Facilities, Specialized Services, Information Technology, and School Operations – evaluated the written and oral responses of those vendors using a formal rubric based on criteria in the following categories: product solution, customer support, vendor assessment, pricing, technical compatibility, and MWBE plan qualification. RFP Review Committee members also called the references of the respondents in order to obtain information about the user experiences of respective clients.

During the year, many issues were identified that are directly related to limited functionality within the software platform. As such, Transportation Services has been working with SEON to define new functionality requirements. Transportation Services is currently unable to access real-time data regarding route changes, on-time performance, and other Key Performance Indicators that would allow for objective analysis and establishing performance metrics. The limitations are largely attributable to the lack of functionality of the COMPASS system as it is currently being used.

APPS: Why is the District increasing the amount of the contract for a software program that has failed to function properly?


Resolution A-53
Operating Budget: $29,737.20 Contract Amendments with Atelier Art Services – Inventory and Storage of Artwork

RESOLVED, that the School Reform Commission authorizes The School District of Philadelphia, through the Superintendent or his designee, to execute, deliver and perform an amendment of Contract No. 488/F10, originally entered into with Atelier Art Services, Inc., pursuant to Resolution No. A-19, approved by the School Reform Commission on October 21, 2009, as amended pursuant to Resolution No. A-10, approved by the School Reform Commission on October 26, 2011, Resolution No. A-14, approved by the School pursuant to Resolution No. A-38, approved by the School Reform Commission on May 29, 2014, as amended pursuant to Resolution No. A-40, approved by the School Reform Commission on August 21, 2014 and as amended pursuant to Resolution No. B-5, approved by the School Reform Commission on October 15, 2015, by increasing the amount of the contract by an additional $12,000 from $72,734.60 approved by Resolutions A-19, A-10, A-14, A-40 and B-5, to an amount not to exceed $84,734.60 to conduct a one-time physical inventory of the artwork in storage, and by extending the term of the contract from its amended scheduled expiration date of June 30, 2016 through June 30, 2018 and by increasing the amount of the contract by an additional $17,737.20 from $84,734.60 approved by Resolutions Nos. A-19, A-10, A-14, A-40 and B-5 to an amount not to exceed $102,471.80.

Description: The purpose of this Resolution is to engage with an arts storage facility that will safeguard the District’s artworks. In addition, the vendor will work with the District to complete a physical inventory of the artwork. This is an important set of services needed to protect our valuable art assets.

APPS Analysis: In 2004, then-CEO Paul Vallas ordered the covert removal of over 1,000 pieces of artwork from District schools. Students, staff and principals returned to school after Christmas break to find empty spaces where their art used to be. All of the art purchased by the Wilson Middle School community over decades, making it an art museum as well as school, was taken with no explanation. Vallas left before he could sell it off. It has been in storage for 12 years. At one time the SRC considered selling the artwork rather than restore it to the schools from which it was taken, but decided against it after a retired Wilson teacher testified about its value to the students.   In 2013 it was determined that 72 of the valuable paintings were missing.

How much money has the District spent on storage, and how many more pieces have gone missing? It is time to restore the artwork to its original homes. The art belongs to the schools and their students.


Resolution A-54
Categorical/Grant Fund: No Cost Contract Extension with Lakeside Educational Network – Independence Mission Schools

RESOLVED, that the School Reform Commission authorizes the School District of Philadelphia through the Superintendent or his designee, to execute, deliver and perform an amendment to Contract No. 615/F16, originally entered into with Lakeside Educational Network, pursuant to Resolution No. A-2, approved by the School Reform Commission on February 18, 2016, by extending the term of the contract from its currently scheduled expiration date of June 30, 2016 through August 31, 2016, at no additional cost.

Description: During the 2015-16 academic year, Independence Mission Schools (IMS) is offering professional development to administrators and teachers to enhance and enrich awareness, understanding and appreciation of the nature of trauma including essential concepts, facts and principles they can apply and present to parents and guardians, and discussions related to the skills that allow for trauma-sensitive responses to students and parents who might be trauma-survivors.

Lakeside Educational Network is providing four, six-week professional development courses on Enhancing Trauma Awareness to a total of 60 administrators and teachers of Pre-K through 8th grade students.

This resolution will allow the six-week courses to extend through August 31, 2016.

APPS Analysis: The best thing the district can do about trauma is to stop inflicting it on our students—like the ones at Huey, Wister, Rhodes, Roosevelt, Mitchell, and Munoz-Marin. Those children will be coming back in September to find most of their teachers and administrators gone.

And Bill Green, who has used his talents to raise funds for the Independence Mission Schools, should recuse himself from this vote.


Resolution A-64
Operating Budget: $2,214,809 Extension of Authorization to Retain and Pay Fees and Costs – Outside Counsel

RESOLVED, that the School Reform Commission authorizes The School District of Philadelphia,
through the General Counsel, to retain the following law firms as outside counsel to represent the School Reform Commission, The School District of Philadelphia and its employees, and to pay counsel fees and related costs and expenses, including, but not limited to, court filing fees, deposition transcripts, expert witness fees, arbitrator and mediator fees and other professional costs, not to exceed $500,000 for fees and costs per matter (except not to exceed $750,000 for fees and costs for labor negotiations, audits and investigations), for an aggregate amount not to exceed $2,214,809, for the period commencing July 1, 2016 through October 31, 2016: [emphasis added]

Ahmad Zaffarese, LLC; Archer & Greiner, P.C.; Assigned Counsel Incorporated (temporary attorneys and paralegals); The Axelrod Firm, PC; Ballard Spahr LLP; Bazelon Less & Feldman, P.C.; Blank Rome LLP; Bowman & Partners, LLP; Brustein & Manasevit, PLLC; Buchanan Ingersoll Rooney P.C.; Cozen O’Connor; Dilworth Paxson LLP; Eckert Seamans Cherin & Mellott, LLC; Fineman, Krekstein & Harris, P.C.; Fox Rothschild LLP; Garcia, Rudolph; Hangley Aronchick Segal Pudlin & Schiller; King, Spry, Herman, Freund & Faul, LLC; Klehr Harrison Harvey Branzburg LLP; Kolber & Randazzo, P.C.; Law Office of Dolores Rocco Kulp; Levin Legal Group; Manko Gold Katcher Fox LLP; O’Hagan LLC; Pepper Hamilton, LLP; Rafaelle & Puppio, LLC; Saul Ewing, LLP; Schnader Harrison Segal & Lewis, LLP; Law Offices of Richard A. Stoloff; Tucker Law Group LLC; White and Williams LLP; Wilson Elser Moskowitz Edelman & Dicker LLP

Description: The Office of General Counsel provides the School District and the School Reform Commission with comprehensive legal services and support in the practice areas of Litigation (Claims, Torts and Civil Rights Litigation, Commercial Litigation, Labor & Employment, audits, investigations, ethics), Transactional (Contracts, Procurement, Real Estate, Design and Construction, Environmental, Charter Schools, Grants, Right-to-Know Law) and Special Education, regulatory matters and School Law. The District retains outside counsel for legal assistance in practice areas including labor negotiations, complex and impact litigation, environmental law, intellectual property, complex real estate and financial transactions, business and corporate law advice, appellate litigation, investigations and audits, pension and profit-sharing plans and other employee benefit plans.

The Office of General Counsel works cooperatively with outside counsel to negotiate reasonable hourly rates, to develop guidelines and strategies for defense, negotiation, settlement and appeals, to manage the work product of outside counsel and to assist outside counsel in acquiring the information they need in order to function at the highest level and to resolve legal matters of the District and to review and approve bills.

The Office of General Counsel and Office of Procurement Services published a Request for Qualifications for outside counsel services in April 2015 (RFQ 141). Thirty law firms and one placement agency responded to the RFQ. After an evaluation process, which includes a diversity questionnaire, the law firms and agencies listed in the Resolved paragraph were found to be qualified. This resolution seeks authority to extend the engagement of outside counsel, approved pursuant to Resolution No. A-20, approved by the School Reform Commission on June 18, 2015, for the period commencing July 1, 2016 through October 31, 2016, in the amount of $2,214,809, which is 33% of the FY 16 budget for Outside Counsel, pending approval of a reorganization of the Office of General Counsel, a new competitive process and subsequent approval by the School Reform Commission of the retention of outside counsel no later than October, 2016.

APPS Analysis: The Hite administration had to have its arm twisted to restore a minimum of one nurse and counselor per school. There is barely any talk of bringing back libraries so that the district could have more than eight certified librarians. Some years Dr. Hite says he is not sure schools will open in September.

But one thing you can always count on: they will find the money—a lot of it—to pay outside law firms, despite the fact that the district has its own Office of General Counsel. $2.2 million for four months? How many teachers, nurses, counselors or librarians would that buy?

Note that one of the firms on the SRC’s payroll is Schader Harrison, where Kenneth Trujillo, who is currently engaged in private negotiations with the SRC on behalf of Aspira, is a partner.


 Resolution A-67

Approval of New School: Kenderton School

RESOLVED, that the School Reform Commission authorizes The School District of Philadelphia, through the Superintendent or his designee, to open Kenderton School, a neighborhood elementary school to be located at 1500 W. Ontario St. and serving grades K through 8. The school shall open in the 2016- 2017 school year; and be it

FURTHER RESOLVED, that the School Reform Commission authorizes The School District of Philadelphia, through the Superintendent or his designee, to prepare, execute and file all documents necessary to obtain approval from the Pennsylvania Department of Education to establish Kenderton School commencing in the 2016-2017 school year.

Description: The School District of Philadelphia plans to establish Kenderton School as a District- operated neighborhood school. Previously, the school had been designated as a charter school under the District’s Renaissance Charter Initiative beginning in the 2013-2014 school year. On May 4, 2016, the charter management organization operating the school – Scholar Academies – announced that it would withdraw its management of the school at the end of the school year. The board of trustees of Kenderton initiated a search for a new charter management organization, but did not find a qualified organization to take over management of the school. As a result, the board voted to surrender its charter.

Given the decisions by Scholar Academies to cease operation of the school and by the board of trustees of Kenderton to surrender its charter, the school will return to District management. The school will remain a neighborhood elementary school serving grades K through 8 beginning in the 2016-2017 school year. The school will maintain its current catchment area in North Philadelphia serving portions of the 19140, 19132, and 19133 zip codes.

APPS Analysis: The SRC granted Young Scholars a 5-year charter to operate Kenderton Elementary in 2013. YS convinced the parents that they would do a better job than the district. What they didn’t tell them was that they would pull out after only three years because they didn’t want to spend the money to educate students with special needs. Parents have been understandably upset; the school received a lot more money while a charter, including substantial grants from the Philadelphia School Partnership. Will the district provide the school with the resources it needs to be successful?

Young Scholars was recommended for non-renewal when it operated Frederick Douglass. The SRC transferred management of the school to Mastery without holding a single public meeting. The SRC has a responsibility to all district stakeholders to hold hearings on the fate of all of its schools. It is well past time to take a hard look at the successes and failures of the Renaissance program.


Resolution A-70 (Pending)
Renaissance Schools Initiative: Approval of Renaissance Charter School License Agreement with John Wister Mastery Charter School

Resolution A-71 (Pending)
Renaissance Schools Initiative: Approval of Renaissance Charter School License Agreement with Global Leadership Academy at Huey Charter School

 APPS Analysis:  The District continues to convert neighborhood schools to Renaissance charters while the cost of charter schools is the number one drain on the District’s budget.  The District’s total disregard for the effect of these extra costs on District run schools is unconscionable.


 Resolution B-12
Categorical/Grant Fund: $91,770 Contract with Philadelphia Education Fund – Postsecondary Success Asset Mapping

RESOLVED, that the School Reform Commission authorizes The School District of Philadelphia, through the Superintendent or his designee, to execute, deliver, and perform a contract with the Philadelphia Education Fund to provide Postsecondary Success Asset Mapping (PSAM) and project management services for up to 12 Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs (GEAR UP) High Schools to support the GEAR UP College Readiness Collaborative Communities (CRCC) Project for an amount not to exceed $91,770, for the period commencing July 1, 2016 through September 24, 2018.

Description: The Philadelphia Education Fund (PEF) aims to provide exceptional outcomes for all students by developing and building paths to college and career success. An active and frequent partner of The School District of Philadelphia over the past thirty years, PEF has continuously strived to help create a Philadelphia in which all young people have the skills and opportunity to succeed in college and career. In 2009 PEF embarked on the Philadelphia Postsecondary Success Project (PPSP). The PPSP is a tri-state initiative designed to increase access to and success in postsecondary education for students from traditionally underserved urban public high schools.

A component of the PPSP initiative is the Postsecondary Success Asset Mapping (PSAM) tool created by FHI360, a nonprofit human development organization specializing in addressing interrelated development challenges. FHI360 serves more than 70 countries and all U.S. states and territories, and has conducted significant research in the area of college and career readiness.
The Postsecondary Success Asset Mapping tool is a research-based tool that helps schools reimagine and more effectively align existing resources, such as time, money and human capital. Its purpose is to assist high schools in guiding underserved students toward successful college careers.

PEF will develop a yearlong project management protocol intended to help GEAR UP CRCC high schools set and achieve postsecondary success goals through the use of the PSAM tool to serve the following GEAR UP CRCC schools: Benjamin Franklin High School, Edison High School, School of the Future, Martin Luther King High School, Penn Treaty, Overbrook High School, West Philadelphia High School, Kensington – Business, CAPA, Health Sciences and Urban Education High Schools, Frankford High School, and Samuel Fels High School. This protocol will include staff training, establishing a Postsecondary Leadership Committee at each of the designated high schools and conduct the Postsecondary Asset Mapping, providing regular and ongoing, support, monitoring and a continuous feedback loop.

APPS Analysis:  SRC Commissioner Farah Jimenez was recently hired as President and CEO of the Philadelphia Education Fund (PEF).  This presents a number of problems which have been raised by members of the public and by Councilman David Oh on the floor of City Council. According to its website PEF “drives exceptional outcomes for all students by developing great teachers and building paths to college and career success…we are also actively working as an agent of change by partnering with the School District to improve policy and practice leading to improved teaching and learning in the classroom.” 

PEF has publicly taken a stand that teachers and school professionals should not have seniority and other collective bargaining rights.  As SRC Commissioner, Ms. Jimenez takes part in the negotiating process for union contracts, and the SRC must vote to approve any contract.  

Commissioner Jimenez already has to recuse herself from voting on resolutions involving the charter schools (Mastery and KIPP) that her husband’s law firm represents.  She will now have to recuse herself from voting on any resolutions involving PEF and the schools that PEF works with, including Aspira schools.  These conflicts of interest bring into question her ability to function as an SRC Commissioner.


 Resolution B-24
Operating Budget: $51,000 Contract with Lorin Nicole Clay – Program and Community Partnerships Coordinator – Science Leadership Academy at Beeber

RESOLVED, that the School Reform Commission authorizes The School District of Philadelphia, through the Superintendent or his designee, to execute, deliver and perform a contract with Lorin Nicole Clay to provide guidance with respect to community partnering, organizing and maintaining coursework with these partners, supporting academic programs, and recruitment events at Science Leadership Academy at Beeber, for an amount not to exceed $51,000, for the period commencing July 1, 2016 through June 30, 2017.

Description: As the Coordinator, Lorin Clay will assist Science Leadership Academy at Beeber with creating and maintaining relationships with outside partners, organize mini-courses and Individualized Learning Projects. Consultant will also support the school with recruitment efforts, site visits, new student orientation, open houses, and supporting academic programs.

APPS: We weren’t able to find any information about Ms. Clay, and none of us has ever seen someone with this job description in any school we worked in, so it’s difficult to know whether or not she is qualified. Does the Hite administration plan to create this position at every school, some schools, or just this one?

Update

The following resolutions have been added or updated as of Tuesday. You can access all of the resolutions from the District’s webpage by clicking on Resolution Summary in the red SRC box.
SRC-13
Withdrawn by Staff 6.14.16

SRC-14
Withdrawn by Staff 6.14.16
(These were requests for charter amendments from Laboratory Charter School of Communication and Languages and Russell Byers Charter School)

SRC-19 (Added 6.14.16)Ratification of Memorandum of Agreement with Local 32BJ District 1201

A-67 (Updated 6.14.16)Re-establishment of the Kenderton School
(This amended A-67seems to be a shorter version of the original post. You can compare it to the one posted in the Eyes.)

A-69 (Updated 6.13.16)
Categorical/Grant Fund: $11,000 Ratification of Contract with Tembo

A-72 (Added 6.10.16)
Donation: Acceptance of Donation from the City of Philadelphia – Replacement of Roof at L. P. Hill School; License Agreement and Right of Way with City

A-73 (Added 6.10.16)
Capital Fund: $711,500 Capital Awards II – F. S. Edmonds School

A-74 (Added 6.10.16)Operating Budget: $400,000 Contract Amendment with The Fund for The School District of Philadelphia

A-75 (Added 6.14.16)
Operating Budget: $132,720 License Agreement with KIPP Charter School – John B. Turner Middle School

No Cost Contract Amendment with Chester County Intermediate Unit – Philadelphia Virtual Academ.